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Previous Winners

2011

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SHRIPAT KAMBLE URBAN ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT AWARD FOR INNOVATIVE RESEARCH

No winner in 2011

 

Award Overview:

Established by an endowment from donations by Dr. Shripat Kamble and from 

Dow AgroSciences, DuPont Professional Products, Rhodes Chemical Company,  

and Syngenta, this award promotes innovative research in urban entomology by 

doctoral students currently conducting research that demonstrates innovative and

realistic approaches to urban entomology (excludes turf and ornamental pests). The

award consists of a $500 research grant along with a plaque. The award is

presented at the Entomological Society of America's annual meeting.

 

Jeffery La Fage Graduate Student Research Award


Timothy J. Husen


http://entsoc.org/sites/default/files/images/2011-Foundation/Tim-Husen.jpgThis grant, which was established by an endowment from donations by Rousell Bio, Dow AgroSciences, FMC, and the friends and family of Dr. Jeffery P. La Fage, is awarded to a graduate student who proposes innovative research that advances or contributes significantly to the knowledge of the biology or control of pests in the urban environment, especially termites or other wood-destroying organisms. Timothy J. Husen, a Ph.D. candidate in entomology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, received his M.S. degree in entomology and his B.S. degree in biological sciences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. His research project, titled “Effects of Chitinase Inhibitor Treated Diet on the Eastern Subterranean Termite, Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar),” examines the palatability, chitinase activity, and concentration dependent mortality of the eastern subterranean termite in response to a chitinase inhibitor treated diet. The goal of this project is to evaluate the potential use of chitinase inhibitors within a termite control program. He has four refereed and 10 non-refereed scientific publications to his name.

 

Award Overview:
This grant encourages research by graduate students in the field of the biology and control of termites or other insect pests of the urban environment. Established as a tribute to the late Jeffery P. LaFage, a professor of urban entomology at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge who specialized in the study of the biology and control of termites. For nearly 10 years before his death, his research activities involved studies of the Formosan subterranean termite and methods of applying this knowledge to the management of this introduced termite.

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Henry and Sylvia Richardson Research Grant

  

Christelle Guédot


http://entsoc.org/sites/default/files/images/2011-Foundation/Christelle-Guedot.jpgThis grant provides research funds to postdoctoral ESA members who have at least one year of promising work experience, are undertaking research in selected areas, and have demonstrated a high level of scholarship. Christelle Guédot is a postdoctoral associate at the USDA-ARS Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory in Washington State and is an adjunct faculty member of the Department of Entomology at Washington State University. Christelle comes from France, where she conducted her undergraduate studies. She then moved to the U.S. in 1998 to conduct her Ph.D. studies on the behavior and chemical ecology of two commercially important solitary bees at Utah State University in collaboration with the USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory. Her current research focuses on the chemical ecology and behavior of pest insects with the aim to identify attractants to control these pests.


Award Overview:

This award recognizes outstanding research by graduate students who have completed investigations in selected areas of entomology. Since Dr. Snodgrass was a leader in insect morphology, the award recipient must have completed his/her research thesis or dissertation in a related field of entomology. The amount of the monetary prize varies each year; and includes a certificate.



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SNODGRASS MEMORIAL RESEARCH AWARD

No winner for 2011

 

Award Overview:

This award recognizes outstanding research by graduate students who have completed investigations in selected areas of entomology. Since Dr. Snodgrass was a leader in insect morphology, the award recipient must have completed his/her research thesis or dissertation in related fields of entomology. The amount of the award varies each year. The awardee is presented with the award at the Entomological Society of America's annual meeting

 

 KENNETH AND BARBARA STARKS PLANT RESISTANCE TO INSECTS GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD

  

Dr. Casey D. Butler


http://entsoc.org/sites/default/files/images/2011-Foundation/Casey-Butler.jpgThis grant is awarded to a graduate student in entomology or plant breeding/genetics for innovative research that contributes significantly to knowledge of plant resistance to insects. Dr. Casey D. Butler is an R&D scientist at Syngenta Crop Protection, Inc. He is a recent Ph.D. graduate from the University of California, Riverside (UCR). He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Purdue University. At UCR, Casey earned his Ph.D. for the development of management strategies for the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), in southern California. The potato psyllid is a major pest of solanaceous crops in North and Central America as well as New Zealand. Potato psyllid causes yield loss by direct feeding on crop plants and by transmitting a bacterial pathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous). The goal of Casey’s research is to build the foundation of integrated pest management against this pest by first developing sampling plans for this pest in agricultural fields, and then to move towards more targeted chemical tools, biological control, and host plant resistance. His research regarding host plant resistance involved collaborators at the USDA-ARS and Texas A&M University by testing 22 possibly resistant potato genotypes on adult potato psyllid behavioral responses for possible antixenosis and determined if specific breeding clones or varieties can decrease transmission of Ca. L. psyllaurous. Five of the potato genotypes significantly decreased Ca. L. psyllaurous transmission compared to controls. The next step is to test these promising genotypes in the field before recommendations can be made for the most effective integration with a potato psyllid and Ca. L. psyllaurous management program.

Award Overview:

Established by an endowment from donations by Kenneth J. and Barbara Starks and additional funding partners, this grant encourages research by graduate students in the field of plant resistance to insects in entomology or plant breeding/genetics. The annual grant consists of a plaque and a research grant dependent on the interest earned from the endowment.

 

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